Sports Nutrition for Youth Ages 13& Up…Part 1

My last few blogs covered sports nutrition for youth athletes 12 years old and under. Now I’ll focus on teenagers, age 13 and up. There will be several similarities and some things unique to this age group. Read on for more information.

*Reminder to note, the guidelines listed in the blog below are based on an average athlete and may not be appropriate for all youth athletes. If you are concerned, please reach out to your physician, send me a question or reach out to a local sports nutritionist/dietician.

As we go from younger athletes focused primarily on health, growth and then performance, we go to older youth athletes with similar but slightly different focuses. In my opinion performance should be in the third spot, however a lot of youth athletes in their teens will put it as #1. They will forgo things that they might need for overall health and growth, in order to do things that they believe will equal better performance.

The nutrition for older youth athletes should be primarily focused on:

  1. Overall Health-always the number one importance, no matter the age
  2. Growth-Puberty
  3. Performance/Recovery

By 13 years, most athletes know what foods they like and don’t like. Now it’s about teaching them specifics on when to eat specific foods, and how those foods will help them achieve their goals.

Overall health is always going to be number one in my book, and hopefully it will stay there as they progress throughout the rest of their lives. For most females, they have already started puberty, or will soon. Most male athletes will be starting puberty in these years, so nutrition for both sexes needs to be a primary focus. Male athletes might even appear to eat  you out of the house. Their body is growing and will usually need more food then you had thought was typical. This is also when females put on more body fat, and their hormones are changing. To them, this is not a good thing. This is good from a biological perspective, however to the athlete, it can cause a multitude of issues. Their body shape is changing, they are putting on weight, they might feel worse, the menstrual cycle starts (or a year or two earlier), etc.  Where food issues and disordered eating patterns might have been emerging in the younger years, these years are where full blown eating disorders develop.

Performance becomes a greater motivator starting in this age group. Team as well as individual sport athletes will be training 1-2x a day 5-6 days per week. Their body is going to be asked to do a lot to support their training and racing, and nutrition needs to be a priority. Nutrition can really make a huge difference in helping athletes to prepare for training, racing and recovering properly. Let’s take a swimmer as an example. A 15 year old swimmer might train 1 hour before school, and then another 2 hours after school. Recovering from their morning swim will be crucial to being prepared for their later swim. Making sure the right nutrients are consumed will help with this.

What Does A Typical Youth Athlete Need? (assuming training 5-6 days per week, 6-15 hours per week)

  • This applies to both team sports or individual sports, however with some sports you end up standing around quite a bit. These numbers are for athletes that are fairly active for all 6-15 hours. A good example is a gymnast.  They might practice 1-3 hours at a time, however they aren’t active for the entire time. Each apparatus means short interval type work. 10min work, 15min break, 10min work, etc. So when thinking of your athlete, think about the time they are actually exercising. Then compare it to what I am suggesting.
  • Older youth athletes training at greater loads, or going through puberty will require more then the typical adult
  • Older youth have greater glycogen stores then their younger athletes do. Their body is much more similar to an adult and will have a greater emphasis on using glycogen.

13& up Athletes:

Male: 2500-3500kcal-some might be above 3500kcal, especially swimmers, runners or winter sports like x-country skiing

  • 50-60% carbohydrate, 6-10g/kg/day i.e. 312-450g/day
  • 15-25% protein, .8g/lb or 1-1.5g/kg/day i.e.115-180g/day
  • 20-35% fat, 83-100g/day

Female: 2200-2500kcal- some might be above 3000kcal, especially swimmers, runners or winter sports like x-country skiing

  • 50-60% carbohydrate, 6-10g/kg/day i.e. 275-375g/day
  • 15-25% protein, .8g/lb or 1-1.5g/kg/day i.e. 83-150g/day
  • 20-35% fat, 50-83g/day

Carbohydrates Why are they So Important?

  1. Carbohydrates=glycogen
  2. Our body uses glycogen to fuel our muscles
  3. Without enough fuel on board, our energy fizzles out, just like gas in a car-no gas, the car doesn’t run
  4. Include them in your  everyday diet: whole grains, fruits and vegetables i.e. whole wheat bread/pasta, brown rice, quinoa, bananas, potatoes
  5. Competition diet: lighter on the fiber if nervous stomach/GI issues: smoothies/liquid nutrition, bananas, “white breads”

*One of my sayings is, your competition diet is the exact opposite of your everyday diet. Your daily diet should consist of complex carbohydrates (like whole grain bread, beans, legumes,etc) which have a lot of fiber. If someone has a nervous stomach or feels bloated or gassy, switching to “white” products (this means more refined) is actually fine, and can be beneficial. The simple sugars found in these products are used very quickly by the body for energy, as they don’t have to be broken down as much, and don’t contain as much fiber. One of my favorites was pancakes. My dad would make me “white” pancakes before swim meets. On a normal day, whole grains were the norm.

What About Sugar? Is it as Harmful as the Media Portrays It?

  • The media preaches the evil of sugar, thus the rise in the low carb and paleo diets. What parents need to realize is, sedentary youth and adults are very different from active youth. I have no problem with sedentary adults reducing their carbohydrate intake, I do have problems with active youth (and adults) doing this. Sedentary youth need to maintain a good balance, and I don’t want youth believing they are on “diets.”
  • Sugar is another name for glucose/glycogen; the fuel we need for training and racing. So how could what we need be harmful? The answer, it’s not. As long as you are just before exercise, during exercise or just after exercise, sugar is not going to cause negative effects. You body is preparing for exercise and topping off your glycogen stores, it’s using the glycogen stores or it’s replenishing the depleted stores from exercise.
  • So, pre, during or post exercise, foods with added sugar/high amounts of natural sugar are not harmful, they provide beneficial carbohydrates for working muscles.
  • The other times of the day when youth athletes are not training or competing, they should stick with natural sugar (fruits, veggies, dairy). Also, reduce added sugar during the day-no Gatorade during class.
  • Sports drinks are fine. As long as they are right before, during and after exercise. Hence, no Gatorade during school. But if your child doesn’t have an easy way to consume calories or carbohydrates while exercising, drinking a sports drink is not a problem. Sure there are some sports drinks I prefer over others, but I want to just get it out there that no, sports drinks aren’t bad, they have a time and a place.

When Should You Take in Carbs vs When Don’t you Need Them?

  • Exercise Less than 30min: No, water is fine
  • Exercise 30-60min: No, water should be fine-you can have added electrolytes if it’s a hot day (i.e. Nuun tabs)
  • Exercise 60+min: Yes, when you’re training or competing over 1 hour, having carbohydrates added into your drink or as a snack can be beneficial

How Many Carbs Should you Take?

  • Pre-exercise-Less than 30min before: >.5g of carb per lb body weight (less than 100kal)- keep the carbs liquid (easy to digest) like a smoothie or sports drink
  • Pre-exercise 30-60min before: .5g of carb per lb body weight (100-150kcal)-keep the carbs liquid to semi liquid-smoothie, applesauce, sports chews
  • Pre-exercise 1-3 hours before: .5-1g of carb per lb body weight (150-300kcal)-can be of any consistency-fruit, sandwich, cereal, dried fruit
  • Pre-exercise 3-4 hours before: 1-1.5g of carb per lb body weight (300-600kcal)-full meals-pasta with meat sauce, cooked veggies, roll

How Many Carbs Should you Consume During your Training or Competition?
40-60g of carb per hour-think sports drink, sport chews, pretzels, bananas- 1 medium banana is 30g of carbohydrate as a reference

Should you Carbo Load?

There is no need to do the traditional carbo load. Making sure your athlete has adequate carbohydrates before and during training and competition will ensure that they have glycogen stores that are topped off and ready for action. If they want to have pasta, go for it. They just don’t need to gorge themselves on it. Think about having a plate that has a 1/3 pasta, 1/3 veggies and 1/3 protein. Athletes of these ages should already be consuming carbohydrates in the 6-10g/kg range. The upper end of this range, or 8-10g/kg is considered to be a carbo loading range.

Hydration:

Hydration is very important for youth of all ages. You may have heard that youth are more vulnerable to heat related conditions. This was believed to be true for a long time, however research is finding that this isn’t the case.

Compared to adults:

  • Youth have a greater surface area compared to their mass-they can effectively dissipate heat
  • Youth have lower sweat rates-their sweat glands are closer together, which allows for greater evaporation
  • Youth take longer to acclimatize to heat
  • Youth expend more energy doing the same activity-this is believed to be true because they are less bio-mechanically efficient
  • Youth regulate their body temperature as efficiently as adults

So really, youth have to worry about hydration to the same degree as adults. Here are some numbers:

Pre-exercise: consume 8-16oz of fluid

During exercise: consume 16-32oz of fluid per hour, along with 300-500mg of sodium

Post-exercise: consume 16-20oz of fluid, along with some sodium-coconut water is a good option.

Part 1, Youth 13& up is complete. Part 2 will feature protein/recovery, periodization of nutrition with exercise, disordered eating, supplements and more. Feel free to post any questions in the comments below, or share with anyone who might need help with this.

 

Sports Nutrition for Youth Athletes, 12 &under….Part2

Onto Part two of 12& under nutrition. Today we’ll tackle protein, hydration, picky eating and weight issues.

Protein:

I’ve done a fair amount of nutrition clinics for youth sports teams, and I know parents seem to have heard and understood the importance of protein. What I’m finding is that the media touts its benefits, and parents think that their athletes need an overabundance of it. It is certainly important, but it’s no more important than that other nutrients. Here’s why:

  • Protein is made up of amino acids. Amino acids are called the building blocks of protein, and there are essential (our body can’t produce them) , nonessential (our body can produce them, and we don’t need to worry about consuming them) and conditional amino acids (usually not essential, except in times of illness/stress).
  • Essential amino acids-there are 9 of them- histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrptophan, and valine. We must consume these in foods.
  • Non-essential amino acids– alanine, asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. Our body makes these.
  • Conditional amino acids– arginine, cysteine, glutamine, tyrosine, glycine, ornithine, proline, and serine.
  • You do not need to eat essential and non-essential amino acids at every meal, however you do need to get them from several meals throughout the day.

Benefits of Protein:

  1. Important for recovery post exercise
  2. Important for growth
  3. Important for muscle repair and rebuilding

How much Protein do youth athletes need?

Most American youth exceed the recommended/needed amounts of protein fairly easily. The RDI for protein is .8g/kg/day. So if your 12year old is 100lbs= 45kg. 45x.8=36g/day.

Youth athletes need more than their sedentary counterparts. They require 1-1.5g/kg/day. So with the same 12year old, this is 45-67g/day. Even with this higher number, most athletes reach it.

Common food and protein amounts:

  • Beef- 3oz= 20g (remember, 3oz of meat looks like a deck of playing cards, so not that much)
  • Fish-3oz=20g
  • Yogurt-1cup=12g
  • Greek Yogurt-1 cup=23g
  • Peanut Butter-2tbsp=8g
  • Beans-1/2cup=8g
  • Milk-1cup=8g

So, if your child has:

Breakfast: 1 glass milk=8g

Snack: Peanut butter with apple=8g

Lunch: Greek yogurt=23g

Dinner: Fish, beans=28g

=67g- and this doesn’t include the protein that is found in smaller amounts in grains, vegetables, bars, etc.

When to take in Protein ?:

Protein should be consumed at every meal and snack during the day. This will ensure that they are consuming the right amounts of protein and protein also keeps them feeling fuller after and in between meals.

Post workout: if the workout is short (less than 60min), then eating breakfast, lunch or dinner within the hour or two is fine. If they do a larger workout (over 60min), it’s great to have a snack of at least 15-20g of protein within 30-60min post workout/competition. And example of this could be Greek yogurt with berries, Milk and a half of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, a smoothie made with milk or yogurt.

Pre-workout is not needed at this age, however protein can be included in the meal 2+ hours before. Consuming too much protein or fat in the hour before a workout or competition slows down digestion and it can sit heavy in the stomach.

Hydration:

Hydration is very important for youth of all ages. You may have heard that youth are more vulnerable to heat related conditions. This was believed to be true for a long time, however research is finding that this isn’t the case.

Compared to adults:

  • Youth have a greater surface area compared to their mass-they can effectively dissipate heat
  • Youth have lower sweat rates-their sweat glands are closer together, which allows for greater evaporation
  • Youth take longer to acclimatize to heat
  • Youth expend more energy doing the same activity-this is believed to be true because they are less bio-mechanically efficient
  • Youth regulate their body temperature as efficiently as adults

So really, youth have to worry about hydration to the same degree as adults. Here are some numbers:

Pre-exercise: consume 8-12oz of fluid

During exercise: consume 12-16oz of fluid per hour, along with 300-500mg of sodium

Post-exercise: consume 8-16oz of fluid, along with some sodium so, a glass of milk is a great option

Picky Eaters:

  • I’ve worked with parents who have picky eaters. So while I’ve never experienced it myself, I can understand. It’s very important that your youth athletes eat a wide variety of foods. They are most likely to reach their daily requirements from a wide variety. If your child will not consume certain foods, keep trying. This is the key.
  • try to make foods in different ways i.e. mashed sweet potatoes vs sweet potato fries
  • go with different foods within the same group-grains-brown rice is a no go, how about quinoa. Or green beans are a no, how about asparagus
  • Once you find which foods your child will readily eat, make sure you have them on hand, and make meals often that include these foods.
  • Lastly, just keep trying. Eventually most children will grow out of this

Youth athletes with weight concerns:

  • Please make sure your coaches are never weighing your athletes. Also, please don’t make it a habit to weigh your child or talk about their weight. It is important for you and their pediatrician to know where they are, but focusing on this will not help them.
  • Don’t use terms such as “bad food” or “good food.” Use terms such as “this food will benefit your performance.” When you use terms that have a negative connotation, this can make certain foods and food groups off-limits. No food or food groups should be off-limits 100% of the time. You might want to explain how eating certain foods will benefit them, and other foods aren’t as beneficial, however saying things like “cookies make you fat” is not good.
  • Children might be entering puberty, their body is changing. Some children enter puberty sooner than others. Especially females. Be aware of this.
  • Some sports are more vulnerable for disordered eating and eating disorders. One study showed that 30-45% of 9-year-old girls had disordered eating thoughts or patterns, specifically in sports that value leanness or aesthetics. These sports include swimming, gymnastics, running. etc.
  • If you are concerned with your child’s weight, reach out to  your pediatrician. Then, contact a local sports dietician or nutritionist who can guide you on the right direction. You might need to make changes with your diet or grocery shopping patterns as well. Along that line, do not comment on your weight, or how overweight or out of shape you are. You can show a good example by buying healthy foods, preparing healthy meals and exercising yourself. Children listen to what you say, so be aware of any comments you’re saying that they might take as criticisms on their weight.
  • Some things to do to help your child who might be overweight
    • make sure you give them at least 3-5 servings of vegetables a day-fiber makes you feel fuller
    • When they want a snack, choose healthy snacks like veggies and hummus, non fat plain yogurt with berries, a handful of almonds. Try to include protein at each meal and snack.
    • allow them to have cookies/cake, however don’t keep them in the house, only have them on special occasions
    • Say no to soda-only have this when it’s a special occasion, like a birthday

Please share with any parents you’d think would find this helpful, and please let me know if you have any questions. The next youth sports nutrition blog will be geared towards 13& up athletes.

 

Sports Nutrition for Youth Athletes, 12 &under….Part1

My cute nephew (in kindergarten)

My cute nephew (in kindergarten)

Two weeks ago I spoke at the International Swim Coaches Association in Florida. I did two talks, both geared towards swim coaches who coached different ages. The one group was the youth swimmers, these were 12&under athletes. The other group was the senior athletes, these were the 13&up. It’s a bit strange to call 13 year olds seniors, but that’s the way they do it in swimming. Since there are many other sports that have active youth participation, I thought it would be good to bring a focus to basic sports nutrition for all youth athletes. I’m going to split this into several blogs, as it’s a lot of info to cover. I’m going to start with overall nutrition and carbohydrates.

*Reminder to note, the guidelines listed in the blog below are based on an average athlete and may not be appropriate for all youth athletes. If you are concerned, please reach out to your physician, send me a question or reach out to a local sports nutritionist/dietician.

First and foremost. This should seem common, however I need to say it again. The nutrition for youth athletes of this age group should be primarily focused on:

  1. Health
  2. Growth
  3. Performance

Take note, performance is third. I’ve seen too many parents and coaches forget that the primary focus on athletes this age should be overall good nutrition, developing good nutrition habits and learning why sports nutrition is important. While achieving success in sport is great, youth of these age groups should be primarily focused on skill development, having fun and trying multiple sports. That’s for another blog though, let’s stick with nutrition today.

What Does A Typical Youth Athlete Need? (assuming training 4-6 days per week, 6-9 hours per week)

  • This applies to both team sports or individual sports, however with some sports you end up standing around quite a bit. These numbers are for athletes that are fairly active for all 6-9 hours. A good example is a gymnast.  They might practice 1-3 hours at a time, however they aren’t active for the entire time. Each apparatus means short interval type work. 10min work, 15min break, 10min work, etc. So when thinking of your athlete, think about the time they are actually exercising. Then compare it to what I am suggesting.
  • Surprisingly, youth athletes have similar nutrient and calorie needs to adults
  • Youth of this age do not store glycogen as easily or as abundantly as older youth or adults do. They use more fat as a fuel source then adults or older youth athletes. This is not to say that they need to consume more fat though. It does mean that parents need to make sure they have carbohydrate based foods and snacks available for their athletes, to replenish the smaller stores.

12&Under Athletes:

Male: 2000-2500kcal

  • 45-55% carbohydrate, 5-8g/kg/day i.e. 225-312g/day
  • 15-30% protein, .8g/lb or 1-1.5g/kg/day i.e. 75-90g/day
  • 25-35% fat, 77-97g/day

Female: 2000-2200kcal

  • 45-55% carbohydrate, 5-8g/kg/day i.e.225-275g/day
  • 15-30% protein, .8g/lb or 1-1.5g/kg/day i.e. 75-83g/day
  • 25-35% fat, 77-85g/day

 

Carbohydrates Why are they So Important?

  1. Carbohydrates=glycogen
  2. Our body uses glycogen to fuel our muscles
  3. Without enough fuel on board, our energy fizzles out, just like gas in a car-no gas, the car doesn’t run
  4. Include them in your  everyday diet: whole grains, fruits and vegetables i.e. whole wheat bread/pasta, brown rice, quinoa, bananas, potatoes
  5. Competition diet: lighter on the fiber if nervous stomach/GI issues: smoothies/liquid nutrition, bananas, “white breads”

*One of my sayings is, your competition diet is the exact opposite of your everyday diet. Your daily diet should consist of complex carbohydrates (like whole grain bread, beans, legumes,etc) which have a lot of fiber. If someone has a nervous stomach or feels bloated or gassy, switching to “white” products (this means more refined) is actually fine, and can be beneficial. The simple sugars found in these products are used very quickly by the body for energy, as they don’t have to be broken down as much, and don’t contain as much fiber. One of my favorites was pancakes. My dad would make me “white” pancakes before swim meets. On a normal day, whole grains were the norm.

 

What About Sugar? Is it as Harmful as the Media Portrays It?

  • The media preaches the evil of sugar, thus the rise in the low carb and paleo diets. What parents need to realize is, sedentary youth and adults are very different from active youth. I have no problem with sedentary adults reducing their carbohydrate intake, I do have problems with active youth (and adults) doing this. Sedentary youth need to maintain a good balance, and I don’t want youth believing they are on “diets.”
  • Sugar is another name for glucose/glycogen; the fuel we need for training and racing. So how could what we need be harmful? The answer, it’s not. As long as you are just before exercise, during exercise or just after exercise, sugar is not going to cause negative effects. You body is preparing for exercise and topping off your glycogen stores, it’s using the glycogen stores or it’s replenishing the depleted stores from exercise.
  • So, pre, during or post exercise, foods with added sugar/high amounts of natural sugar are not harmful, they provide beneficial carbohydrates for working muscles.
  • The other times of the day when youth athletes are not training or competing, they should stick with natural sugar (fruits, veggies, dairy). Also, reduce added sugar during the day-no Gatorade during class.
  • Sports drinks are fine. As long as they are right before, during and after exercise. Hence, no Gatorade during school. But if your child doesn’t have an easy way to consume calories or carbohydrates while exercising, drinking a sports drink is not a problem. Sure there are some sports drinks I prefer over others, but I want to just get it out there that no, sports drinks aren’t bad, they have a time and a place.

When Should You Take in Carbs vs When Don’t you Need Them?

  • Exercise Less than 30min: No, water is fine
  • Exercise 30-60min: No, water should be fine-you can have added electrolytes if it’s a hot day (i.e. Nuun tabs)
  • Exercise 60+min: Yes, when you’re training or competing over 1 hour, having carbohydrates added into your drink or as a snack can be beneficial

How Many Carbs Should you Take?

  • Pre-exercise-Less than 30min before: >.5g of carb per lb body weight (less than 100kal)- keep the carbs liquid (easy to digest) like a smoothie or sports drink
  • Pre-exercise 30-60min before: .5g of carb per lb body weight (100-150kcal)-keep the carbs liquid to semi liquid-smoothie, applesauce, sports chews
  • Pre-exercise 1-3 hours before: .5-1g of carb per lb body weight (150-300kcal)-can be of any consistency-fruit, sandwich, cereal, dried fruit
  • Pre-exercise 3-4 hours before: 1-1.5g of carb per lb body weight (300-600kcal)-full meals-pasta with meat sauce, cooked veggies, roll

How Many Carbs Should you Consume During your Training or Competition?
– 20-40g of carb per hour-think sports drink, sport chews, pretzels, bananas

 

Should you Carbo Load?

There is no need to do the traditional carbo load. Making sure your athlete has adequate carbohydrates before and during training and competition will ensure that they have glycogen stores that are topped off and ready for action. If they want to have pasta, go for it. They just don’t need to gorge themselves on it. Think about having a plate that has a 1/3 pasta, 1/3 veggies and 1/3 protein.

That’s a wrap on the 1st blog post for youth nutrition. Please feel free to ask me any questions, or share with fellow parents if you think it might be helpful.

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal, GF/DF

Going with my fall theme of chili yesterday, today I made baked oatmeal. I love oatmeal, and it’s a fantastic breakfast (or lunch/dinner) for athletes.  Oats have great carbohydrates, fiber, protein, beta glucan (immune boosting and cholesterol lowering), manganese, molybedenum, B vitamins and more.  A steaming hot bowl of oatmeal can warm the soul on a cold day, but sometimes you don’t have time to make it. So in steps baked oatmeal. You can make this on Sunday, and have 6 days worth of breakfasts ready to go in the morning. No prep time required unless you’d like to heat it or add some Greek yogurt on the side for more protein. When my athletes tell me they are rushed with training, school/work, and families, I try to steer them towards easier foods. If you’re in that same boat, you just might want to try baked oatmeal. So give this a whirl. In addition to the benefits of speed, ease and the nutrition from the oats, the walnuts and ground seeds in this baked version have added omega 3 fatty acids.

I decided to go with a carrot cake version, however I’m going to be trying blueberry lemon and pumpkin pie backed oatmeal in the next few weeks. Yesterday, Brett left for Texas. His job starts Tuesday the 8th, and so he gave himself 3 days to get there. On Friday, my parents Brett and I went out to dinner to celebrate his new job. We went to Bistro 11, a newer restaurant in Victor, NY that replaced the old McGann’s Pub. It turns out, it’s an awesome family Italian restaurant. Delicious food, moderately priced, great selection, etc. The name wouldn’t have clued me into the Italian part though. For dessert the 4 of us split a piece of carrot cake. And let me tell you, it was heavenly. It was moist, sweet, and had the perfect cream cheese frosting. My mouth is watering thinking about it. The combination of spices was delicious, and that is when I had the idea for baked carrot cake oatmeal. I will admit, it isn’t nearly as tasty as the actual carrot cake. But to me it could pass for dessert.

*I used pineapple juice, in addition to almond milk. I wanted to make sure it was moist, and in using both, I think I made the bake time much longer than normal. Normally I bake oatmeal for 30-40min. This took 60min. So, next time (or if you want to experiment) I’m going to cut down the milk to just 1 cup.

 

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal

 

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal: (Serves 6)

  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil, melted
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 1.5 cups unsweetened almond milk/skim
  • 1/2 cup pineapple juice
  • 3 cups gluten free oats if needed
  • 4 tbsp ground flax/chia/hemp (I used hemp)
  • 1tbsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1.5 cups shredded carrots-3 large carrots
  • 1/2 cup crushed pineapple
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Spray or line a 8×8 or 9×9 baking dish with parchment paper.
  2. You’ll use 3 bowls. Two medium and 1 large.
  3. In the large bowl, beat eggs, applesauce, maple syrup, coconut oil, vanilla, milk and pineapple juice.
  4. In a medium bowl place oats, ground flax, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, salt and baking powder. Stir together gently.
  5. In the third bowl shred the carrots and add the pineapple, walnuts and raisins. Stir gently.
  6. Pour the oat mixture into the egg mixture and stir.
  7. Pour the carrot mixture into the now oat mixture and stir well.
  8. Pour into the baking dish and bake 45-60min. My dish took 60min. It will be browned on the top and edges, but slightly moist.
  9. I waited 30min till a cooled slightly before cutting. If you’d like to eat it right from the oven, it might be a bit more crumbly.
  10. Cut into 6 pieces. Serve with plain Greek yogurt for additional protein.

Nutrition per piece:

  • 389kcal
  • 52g carbohydrate
  • 11g protein
  • 17g fat
  • 6g fiber
  • 230mg sodium

 

 

 

Oregon Ducks Football Home Opener plus Pub Chili

Today is the day that many of us have been waiting for, it’s the opening weekend of college football!!! The Oregon Ducks are taking on Eastern Washington, and it’s going to be exciting to see the new team in action. I’ll admit that I’m not the most astute when it comes to listing off stats, or the history of the team (ask Brett), however ever since living in Eugene ( 2007-2012), I’ve been a Ducks fan.

Not only is fall football season, it’s also my favorite time of year. Those cool crisp days, where it gets warm enough to remind you of summer, but the air has that cool crisp feel. The leaves start to change, pumpkins, apples and winter squash come into season and it’s time for more warm comforting food.

So, today being the start of college football, and fall being on the way, it seemed like a great time to make chili. The only problem I have with today is, it’s 88 degrees out. If we didn’t have air conditioning, this would definitely not be meal of choice. But thankfully technology allows me to create a warm and hearty meal, without sweating too much!

This chili is called Pub Chili because I used beer in it. If you have kids, don’t worry, the alcohol cooks out. Only a slight flavor of ale will stay. Since we’re moving to Texas, we’re about to move to the land where chili with beans is sacrilegious. I guess since I’m not there yet, it’s ok to still put in beans. They add protein, fiber, iron, B vitamins and potassium, and are definitely in this chili. I will try Texas chili though, so I’m not discounting it entirely. Comparing them nutritionally, beans will always be a standout. Here’s my recipe for Pub Chili, and it can simmer 30min if you need to eat dinner soon, or allow to simmer another 1-2 hours for a richer flavor. Serve with corn bread if you’d like.

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Pub Chili- 6 hearty servings or 8 smaller ones

  • 1 lb lean ground beef
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 small or 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 cups red bell pepper, chopped
  • 12oz beer of choice (gluten free if needed)
  • 2x 10oz Rotel tomatoes (I used these, however feel free to chop your own chiles and just use diced tomatoes)
  • 28oz crushed tomatoes
  • 6oz tomato paste
  • 3x 15oz can beans (I used kidney, black and pinto), rinsed and drained
  • 2 tbsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  1. Heat a large stock pot over medium heat. Add ground beef and cook until done. Drain off any additional fat.
  2. To the pot add the garlic, onion and red pepper. Saute for 5 minutes until the vegetables start to soften.
  3. Pour the beer over the vegetables and stir.
  4. Stir in the Rotel and crushed tomatoes.
  5. Stir in the tomato paste.
  6. Pour in the beans, and stir.
  7. Add the spices, and simmer, 30min-2 hours.
  8. Serve topped with cheese if desired

Nutrition: 6 servings

  • 487kcal
  • 58g carbohydrate
  • 29g protein
  • 15g fat
  • 20g fiber
  • 483mg sodium

*each serving provides over 100% daily vitamin C, and 9mg of iron (50% daily RDI).

 

GO DUCKS!!!